Clement-Jones family v2/21 - Person Sheet
Clement-Jones family v2/21 - Person Sheet
NameArthur TREVOR, 16582
Death1666
FatherSir Edward TREVOR , 2361 (1580-1642)
MotherAnne BALL , 2362
Notes for Arthur TREVOR
A judge.


The younger son of Sir Edward by his first wife, was trained to the law, entering Middle Temple on 3 November 1624, and being called to the Bar 10 February 1633. In 1641 he appeared on behalf of the thirteen bishops impeached by the Commons, in the following February he petitioned Parliament to procure the release of his father in Ireland, and in April 1642, advised Edward Herbert (died 1657) on his defence when the Commons impeached him. On the outbreak of Civil War he joined the king in a civilian capacity at Oxford, whence he was sent on various missions, including that of settling disputes caused in South Wales (December 1642) by the independent command granted to lord Herbert, later earl of Glamorgan. In July 1643 he was one of the signatories of the declaration drawn up by a council of war at Shrewsbury, imposing an oath of loyalty on the North Wales counties in face of the impending invasion by Sir T. Myddelton.

Later in the year he became paid agent at the court to Ormonde, lord-lieutenant of Ireland, and by February 1644 was also attached to Rupert, whose appointment as president of Wales he urged on the court, and whom he followed to Chester in June, helping to keep him in touch with archbishop John Williams. He wrote eye-witness accounts of many of the campaigns, and eventually participated as lieutenant-colonel in that of 1645-6 in the south-west, where he was captured and imprisoned at Bristol (April-December 1646) till he compounded (at one-tenth) for forty pounds. After further imprisonment in January 1648, he was left at liberty, helped the government to recover scattered Irish records, and resumed practice in 1659. At the Restoration he was named for the abortive order of the Royal Oak, and in July 1661 made a judge of the Brecknock circuit. He befriended his brother John's younger son, afterwards Sir John Trevor (1637 - 1717; below), whom he made his heir, but was accused of illegally administering and misappropriating the revenues of the Brynkynallt estate (then valued at £400 in Denbighshire and £1,000 in Ireland) during the minority of the 'idiot' heir, Edward Trevor.
Notes for Arthur TREVOR
Trained to the law, entering Middle Temple on 3 November 1624, and being called to the Bar 10 February 1633. In 1641 he appeared on behalf of the thirteen bishops impeached by the Commons, in the following February he petitioned Parliament to procure the release of his father in Ireland, and in April 1642, advised Edward Herbert (died 1657) on his defence when the Commons impeached him. On the outbreak of Civil War he joined the king in a civilian capacity at Oxford, whence he was sent on various missions, including that of settling disputes caused in South Wales (December 1642) by the independent command granted to lord Herbert, later earl of Glamorgan.

In July 1643 he was one of the signatories of the declaration drawn up by a council of war at Shrewsbury, imposing an oath of loyalty on the North Wales counties in face of the impending invasion by Sir T. Myddelton. Later in the year he became paid agent at the court to Ormonde, lord-lieutenant of Ireland, and by February 1644 was also attached to Rupert, whose appointment as president of Wales he urged on the court, and whom he followed to Chester in June, helping to keep him in touch with archbishop John Williams.

He wrote eye-witness accounts of many of the campaigns, and eventually participated as lieutenant-colonel in that of 1645-6 in the south-west, where he was captured and imprisoned at Bristol (April-December 1646) till he compounded (at one-tenth) for forty pounds.

After further imprisonment in January 1648, he was left at liberty, helped the government to recover scattered Irish records, and resumed practice in 1659. At the Restoration he was named for the abortive order of the Royal Oak, and in July 1661 made a judge of the Brecknock circuit. He befriended his brother John's younger son, afterwards Sir John Trevor (1637 - 1717; below), whom he made his heir, but was accused of illegally administering and misappropriating the revenues of the Brynkynallt estate (then valued at £400 in Denbighshire and £1,000 in Ireland) during the minority of the 'idiot' heir, Edward Trevor.
Last Modified 7 Nov 2020Created 11 Dec 2021 using Reunion for Macintosh