Clement-Jones family v2/21 - Person Sheet
Clement-Jones family v2/21 - Person Sheet
NamePhilip HOLLAND, 14112
Birth1721
Death1789
FatherThomas HOLLAND , 11570 (1690-1753)
MotherMary SAVAGE , 13766 (1695-1781)
Spouses
Birth1728
Death1822
FatherJohn HOLLAND , 671 (1690-1770)
MotherMary COLTHURST , 833 (1682-1757)
ChildrenPhilip Henry , 14147 (-1788)
 Catherine , 14152
Notes for Philip HOLLAND

Of Bolton

Entry from DNB


Nonconformist divine, eldest son of Thomas Holland, was born at Wem, Shropshire, in 1721.

His grandfather was John Holland, of Dam Head House, Mobberly Parish, Cheshire (d.1713). The Hollands of Mobberly and Knutsford were local yeoman farmers, supporters of the Protestant Dissenting congregation that built the Brook Street Chapel, Knutsford. His father, Thomas Holland (d. 1753) was a pupil of James Coningham [q.v.], was approved to preach by theCheshire Classis (9th November, 1711) and was ordained on the 3rd of August, 1714.

Around 1712, Thomas Holland succeeded Joseph Mottershead [q.v.] to the congregation at Kingsley,Cheshire, removing to the congregation in Wem, Shropshirearound 1716-1717. Though ministering in Shropshire, heremained a member of the Cheshire Classis until his death onthe 26th September, 1753. Philip Holland’s mother was Mary Savage, granddaughter of Philip Henry .

Philip Holland entered Philip Doddridge’sAcademy in 1739. He was followed in 1744 by his brother John, who was minister to the Protestant Dissenting congregations at Wem, Shropshire and Allostock, Cheshire, before conforming in1763. His brother Henry entered Doddridge’s Academy in 1751 and transferred to Daventry upon Doddridge’s death.

He was minister in Prescot and Ormskirk, Lancashire, where he died onthe 10th of December, 1781.

Philip first preached at Wolverhampton, Staffordshire,succeeding his father to the pastorate at Wem. In 1755 he became the minister of Bank Street Chapel, Bolton, Lancashire,in succession to Thomas Dixon (1721-1754) [see under DIXON, THOMAS, M.D]. He died at Bolton on the 2nd of January, 1789,aged 67. There is a mural monument to his memory in BankStreet Chapel.He married his cousin, Catherine Holland, of Mobberley.

Catherine was Mrs Gaskell’s great aunt. They had a son, Philip Henry Holland M.D.(d.1788) and a daughter Catherine, who married John Cole Rankin, merchant of Newcastle upon Tyne. The ministerial career of Philip’s brother, John Holland, should not be confused with that of his wife Catherine’s brother, John Holland, who was born 24th November, 1720, attended Rotherham’s Academy at Kendal, went to Glasgow but did not graduate. He ministered in Ormskirk in 1744 but his first position was as assistant minister at the High Pavement Chapel, Nottingham. He was called to Chowbent, Lancashire, but died before commencing his work and was buried in Knutsford, 28th December, 1751.

Philip Holland’s theology was that of the Arminian Presbyteriandivines of his day. At Wolverhampton he is described as being more liberal than his former tutor and out of step with themajority of the congregation ‘who were inclined for the mostpart to the tenets of Calvin.’ He was influenced by John Seddonof Warrington [q.v.], who introduced him to the moral philosophyof Francis Hutcheson. He was most probably an Arian bythe time of his Lancashire pastorate. During the 1750s in Bolton, a number of the Bank Street congregation left because of the tenets preached by Dixon and Holland, joining John Bennet’sMethodist chapel at Duke’s Alley, which became Independent in1759.

Holland’s congregation flourished and was enlarged in 1760. Richard Arkwright, cotton spinning entrepreneur and pioneer of the factory system, was a member of the Bank Street congregation between 1750 and 1767. Holland ran a boarding school in Bolton, training, amongst others, Josiah Wedgewood’sson. He assisted Seddon in the foundation of the WarringtonAcademy in 1757 and contributed to the debate over theintroduction of liturgical forms into dissenting worship, writingthe third service in A Form of Prayer and a New Collection of Psalms, for the use of a congregation of Protestant Dissenters inLiverpool (1763), generally known as the ‘Liverpool Liturgy.’

He was active in the movement to repeal (1779) the doctrinal subscription required by the Toleration Act and was an advocateof independence for the American colonies. In the last decade of his life his views became somewhat more heterodox, Job Orton complaining that Holland had sunk ‘the inspiration of the apostles and their epistles lower than I think he can justify.’He published several sermons, including ‘The Importance of Learning’ (1760) which was reprinted in the English Preacher,vol. 9, (1773). Posthumously published was ‘Sermons onPractical Subjects’ (1792), 2 vols.

This collection was edited by John Holland and William Turner [q.v.]. It contains all hisseparate publications and a silhouette likeness. Some of hisletters have been printed in the ‘Seddon Papers’, ChristianReformer
(1854, 1855)


Friom Wikipedia

The eldest son of Thomas Holland, he was born at Wem, Shropshire. His grandfather, Thomas Holland (died 1675, aged 57), had been a member of the first presbyterian classis of Lancashire, and was ejected from Blackley Chapel, Lancashire, by the Uniformity Act 1662. His father, Thomas Holland, a pupil of James Coningham, was ordained in August 1714 as presbyterian minister at Kingsley, Cheshire, and moved to Wem, Shropshire, in 1717. His mother was Mary Savage, granddaughter of Philip Henry.

Philip Holland entered Philip Doddridge's dissenting academy at Northampton in 1739. He was followed in 1744 by his brother John, who conformed; and in 1751 by his brother Henry, who was transferred to Caleb Ashworth's Daventry Academy, and became minister at Prescot and (1765) at Ormskirk, where he died on 10 December 1781.

Minister

Philip first preached at Wolverhampton, Staffordshire; he then became his father's successor at Wem. In the autumn of 1755 he became minister of Bank Street Chapel, Bolton, Lancashire, in succession to Thomas Dixon. On account of the popularity of his ministry, the chapel was enlarged in 1760. He kept a boarding-school also. From 1785 William Hawkes (1759–1820) was his colleague.

In theology Holland was of the Arian school, influenced by John Seddon of Warrington, who introduced him to the philosophy of Francis Hutcheson. He assisted Seddon in setting up (1757) Warrington Academy, and wrote the third service in a collection of forms of prayer (1763) edited by Seddon, and generally known as the Liverpool Liturgy. He took an active part in the movement for the repeal (1779) of the doctrinal subscription required by the Toleration Act; after this date his views became somewhat more heterodox. In politics he was an advocate of the independence of the American colonies.

He died at Bolton on 2 January 1789, aged 67. There was a mural monument to his memory in Bank Street Chapel. He married Catharine Holland of Mobberley, Cheshire, and had a son and daughter.

Works[edit]
He published sermons, including: ‘The Importance of Learning,’ &c., Warrington, 1760, (reprinted in English Preacher, 1773, vol. ix.) Posthumous was: ‘Sermons on Practical Subjects,’ &c., Warrington, 1792, 2 vols. (this collection, to which a silhouette likeness is prefixed, includes his separate publications, and was edited by John Holland and William Turner). Some of his letters to Seddon are printed in the ‘Seddon Papers’ in the Christian Reformer, 1854 and 1855.

References[edit]
"Holland, Philip". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900.
Attribution

This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: "Holland, Philip". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900.
Last Modified 22 Aug 2014Created 11 Feb 2021 using Reunion for Macintosh