Clement-Jones family v2/21 - Person Sheet
Clement-Jones family v2/21 - Person Sheet
NameJohn MANNERS-SUTTON 3rd Baron Manners, 4741
Notes for John MANNERS-SUTTON 3rd Baron Manners
John Thomas Manners-Sutton was born on the 15 May 1852 to John Thomas Manners-Sutton, 2nd Baron Manners and Lydia Sophia Dashwood. On 12 August 1885, Manners married Constance Edwina Adelaide Hamlyn-Fane with whom he had twin daughters; Angela Margaret and Betty Constance Manners, born 15 June 1889; and a son, Francis Henry Manners-Sutton, 4th Baron Manners, MC, born 21 July 1897. Constance died on 4 March 1920 and on the 5 September 1922 Manners was re-married to Zoe Virginie Guinness (née Nugent), the widow of Claude Hume Campbell Guinness.[1] Manners was perhaps most notable for an extraordinary wager, betting he could buy, train and ride to victory, a horse in the Grand National.[2] He died on 19 August 1927.

The wager

In 1881, Manners made a bet that he could buy, train and ride the winner of the 1882 Grand National. With just a few months in which to prepare, Manners managed to procure a horse called Seaman for £1,900. The vendor an Irishman called Lindt, was not certain that the horse could be trained to the required standard in time for the race and few believed Manners had the riding ability or experience necessary.[2]

The day of the race brought some of the worst weather conditions in Aintree's history. The freezing conditions and snow meant many jockeys took a more cautious approach and held back, but Manners drove on until he found himself level with the favourite at the final fence. Manner's horse started to go lame but he managed to press it over the line to win his bet by a short lead.[2] The horse never raced again but lived with the family at the family home for the rest of its life.

Avon Tyrrell house

With the proceeds of his wager, Manners built a house, Avon Tyrell, on his sister-in-law's land in Sopley, Hampshire.[2] The medium-sized country residence was designed by the renowned architect W.R. Lethaby and was completed in 1891.[4] Built with 365 windows, 52 rooms, 12 chimneys, 4 wings and 7 external doors; it is what is commonly known as a 'calendar house'.[5] It is now a Grade I listed building and is considered to be one of the archetypal Arts & Crafts buildings.[4]

The racehorse, Seaman, is buried in the grounds between two trees, having lived out its days as a family pet.[2]

The house was used as a hospital during the second world war. The family never moved back in however, and in 1949 it was donated to the 'youth of the nation'. To that end, Avon Tyrrell House is now owned by a charity that provides holidays, courses, personal development and activities for young people.[2]

Family

On 12 Aug 1885, Manners married Constance Edwina Adelaide Hamlyn-Fane the daughter of Henry Edward Hamlyn-Fane and Susan Hester Hamlyn-Williams. They had four children: Twin daughters, Angela Margaret and Betty Constance Manners, born 15 June 1889; An older daughter, Mary Christine, born 4 December 1886[6][7] and a son, Francis Henry Manners-Sutton, later to be, 4th Baron Manners, MC, born 21 July 1897. Constance died on 4 March 1920 and on the 5 September 1922 Manners was re-married to Zoe Virginie Guinness (née Nugent), the widow of Claude Hume Campbell Guinness; and daughter of Albert Llewellyn Nugent, 3rd Baron Nugent and Elizabeth Baltazzi.[1]
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Last Modified 4 Feb 2013Created 11 Feb 2021 using Reunion for Macintosh